Powershell installation of Sitecore Performance Counters

Today was the day I bit the bullet and automated this bit of administrative work that we do for all our Sitecore projects. I think it was the fresh crop of 9 new Sitecore IIS nodes that needed this attention that was the final impetus.

Sitecore Performance Counters

This blog reviews all the perf counters Sitecore makes available.  The documentation is a bit thin from Sitecore, since these counters were added to the product several years ago and they apparently don’t get much attention.  They do require special effort to setup as part of your IIS environment, too, so it’s easy to overlook them.  They’re still very handy, though!  A future blog post could discuss the ones most worthy of attention (in my humble opininion).

You can download the .zip file with an installer for the Sitecore specific performance counters at http://sdn.sitecore.net/upload/sdn5/faq/administration/sitecorecounters.zip.  These files are what you’ll end up with:

counters.JPG

The .EXE runs through all the .XML files in the directory that enumerate perf counters relevant to Sitecore, and adds the counter to the computer.  It’s easy.

Scripted Installation

One would typically click the SitecoreCounters.EXE, press the {enter} key, and then the performance counters would quickly install to the server.  Doing this for many servers, or as part of an automated provisioning effort, could be tedious . . . we actually invoke this via remote magic with Ansible (but that’s not the focus of this blog post).  I do want to go over how we automated this, however, since it wasn’t the smooth sailing I expected it to be.

I’ve posted a Powershell baseline for installing Sitecore perf counters to this github gist.  It was straight-forward Powershell until I found the .EXE was running properly, but no performance counters were actually being added.  I had to look at the decompiled .EXE source to figure out why.  Here’s the Main method of the .EXE; I’ve bolded the instruction that was giving me problems:

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Press enter to begin creating counters");
            Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Creating Sitecore counters");
            string[] files = args;
            if (args.Length == 0)
            {
                files = Directory.GetFiles(Environment.CurrentDirectory, "*counter*.xml");
            }
            foreach (string str in files)
            {
                new Counters(str).Execute();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Done");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

The “Environment.CurrentDirectory” in Powershell is by default something like C:\Users\UserName, but my Powershell was using a staging location to download and unzip the perf counter executable and related xml:

$zipFileURI = "https://your.cdn.with.the.Sitecore.zip.resources/sitecorecounters%207.5.zip"
$stageFolder = "C:\staging" 
if( !(test-path $stageFolder) )
{
    mkdir $stageFolder
}
$downLoadZipPath = $stageFolder + "/SitecoreCounters.zip"  
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $zipFileURI -OutFile $downLoadZipPath
Add-Type -AssemblyName System.IO.Compression.FileSystem
[System.IO.Compression.ZipFile]::ExtractToDirectory($downLoadZipPath, $stageFolder)

Based on what I saw in Reflector, I needed to change my staging directory or to assign the Environment.CurrentDirectory to be $stageFolder in order for the perf counters to properly be installed to the new environment.  I really wanted to use a configurable location instead of some default Powershell directory, so I sifted through Powershell documentation and figured out the magic API call was [System.IO.Directory]SetCurrentDirectory; this example makes it apparent:

Write-Output "Default directory:"
 [System.IO.Directory]::GetCurrentDirectory()
 [System.IO.Directory]::SetCurrentDirectory($stageFolder + "\sitecorecounters 7.5")
 Write-Output "Directory changed to:"
 [System.IO.Directory]::GetCurrentDirectory()

With that in place, the context of the Sitecore perf counter .EXE was set properly and the program could locate all the counters defined in the XML files.

The end result is our new Sitecore specific perf counters are ready:

counters2.JPG

You will need to recycle the Sitecore App Pool in IIS for this to take effect, something like this should suffice:

$theSite = "Cool Sitecore Site"
$thePool = (Get-Item "IIS:\Sites\$theSite"| Select-Object applicationPool).applicationPool
Restart-WebAppPool $thePool
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